5 Effective Foods For Losing Weight

There are several ways to lose weight. First, exercising regularly is one of the most common ways. People often go outside jogging or running with their friends or neighbor; it is very effective. On the other hand, you can implement a practicing plan at home with your machine. Remember to choose a well-known brand with high-quality products. For example, the Schwinn IC2 is one popular device for beginners who are getting used with working out at home. To find best spin bikes, go to ExerciseBikesExpert.Com. This website has a lot of information and good reviews about spin bikes – one of the most effective machine for losing weight.

Second, it is necessary that individual has a healthy diet plan. Do you want to lose 6 pounds in a healthy method? Consider these 5 power foods in every meals. Also, don’t forget to control the portion of your food.

food-blast-fat1. SALMON

Fishes provide a lot of nutrition for people who are going to lose weight. Therefore, individual should maintain eating fish regularly. In fact, the color of salmon flesh is often pink. And it can change from red to orange, depends on the type of salmon fish.

One advantage when eating salmon is that it provides a large amount of omega-3 fats. This ingredient will improve the function of your heart and brain, connect all the joints in your body and improve well-being.

2. CUCUMBERS

cucumbersEating cucumbers will provide 90% of water. It is an ideal food for people who are going on diet and don’t want to consume much calories. Cucumbers haven’t been suggested as one of the vegetables which provide rich nutrition to your health. However, it contributes a unique benefit and advantage to individuals.

Cucumbers have 3 main nutrition which are good for the health include lignans, flavonoids and cucurbitacins. These nutrition can help preventing inflammatory and cancer among people, especially young generation.

3. STRAWBERRIES

strawberriesIf you haven’t taste strawberries before, you should. They are not only give the sense of sweetness and deliciousness, but provide lots of nutrition as well. In addition, individual is more likely to gather lots of Vitamin C when eating a bowl of strawberries.

On the other hand, one advantage of strawberries which will amaze you is that it can improve your eyes ‘health. To illustrate, eating strawberries will help limiting the risk of taking cataracts – which can make people become blind when getting older.

Moreover, Vitamin C in strawberries also plays an essential role in enhancing the capacity of the eye’s retina and cornea.

4. HAZELNUTS

HAZELNUTSThis type of grain contains lots of fiber, folate and potassium. Eating this ingredient will reduce the risk of taking cardiovascular disease. In addition, it help decreasing the level of blood pressure and inflammation in your body.
One more advantage for this grain is that eating hazelnuts stimulates the metabolism in your body and provide lots of fiber. Therefore, you are less likely to feel hungry which lead to eating too much.

5. EGGS

egg

In fact, eggs provide lots of cholesterol. Eating one large egg will give your body 185 mg of cholesterol. To illustrate, the ingredients in eggs will help improving the function of your brand and heart. For people who want to lose weight healthily, eating eggs will provide lots of calories without making you become fatter.

And remember to add up these ingredients into your meals include:
• Spinach
• Balsamic vinegar
• Fresh dill
• Dijon mustard – Apple cider vinegar
• Mustard seed
• Sugar – Honey
• Feta

Above are 5 powerful foods which is good for your health. In addition, people who are going on diet can utilize these ingredients to make your meals become more delicious. And why don’t try these food to prepare delicious and healthy meals for your family as well.

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The weight-loss artist: Janice Taylor found her true passion- and the key to slimming down – in a creative hobby

When it came to dieting, Janice Taylor had tried it all. “I did the Scarsdale diet, the grapefruit diet, Atkins: I did Weight Watchers four times,” she says. “On every one, I’d lose 20 pounds, then gain them all back. It was so depressing!”

Burdened by a family history of obesity and a dysfunctional relationship with cake, Taylor nearly gave up. But then, in 2001, at age 48, the aspiring artist (and former student at New York City’s Parsons School of Design) had a moment of divine inspiration. “I was sitting in one of those weight loss meetings, listening to everybody’s story and getting frustrated. And then I swear I heard a voice say, ‘If you say you’re never going to make It, you never will. You’re an artist–make art.'”

And so she did. Using diet recipes as inspiration, Taylor began the Sexy, Vegetable Series, a collection of paper collages featuring cucumbers, carrots, pumpkins, and peppers. Whenever she felt a craving, she’d run to her studio instead of to the fridge.

The smell of the Elmer’s glue she used to paste her collages reminded Taylor of her childhood and of the kind nuns who lived in a convent near where she grew up. With that memory in mind, Taylor jovially imagined her guidance was coming from a personal patron saint–whom she dubbed Our Lady of Weight Loss.

Janice-TaylorThe voice was powerful: Within eight months, Taylor had lost 45 pounds. She knew she’d arrived when her husband, Peter, looked at her one morning, awestruck, and said, “Wow!” Her two children, Josh, 29, and Abby, 30, were similarly enthusiastic. “After losing all that weight, I could even fit into my daughter’s clothes!” adds Taylor with a laugh. Today, three years later, she’s still a size four.

As if that weren’t enough reward, Taylor’s art has been getting as much attention as her figure. At a recent gallery show in New York City, where Taylor lives, Our Lady pieces sold for $500-plus each. Last year, by popular demand, ourladyofweightloss.com was launched to sell Taylor’s works–including cards, T-shirts, and JustDessert plates. More than marketing, the site is a way for Taylor to help others fighting the battle of the bulge: “Janice is a support to those of us struggling to keep off weight,” says devotee Jennifer Koenig of Bridgeport, Connecticut, one of more than 2,500 subscribers to Taylor’s e-mail newsletter.

After 17 years of working in administrative positions, Taylor has finally been able to turn her creative passion into a profitable full-time profession. “I consider my work performance art,” she jokes. “Think about it: I exchanged 50 pounds of weight for 50 pieces of art. That’s a performance!”

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20 questions that can change your weight

calories quizWeight-loss guru Jim Karas reveals the secret to serious slimming: get an A+ on this calorie-counting quiz. (fitness diet)

The weight-loss industry preaches that we shouldn’t worry about calories. Instead, we should applaud ourselves for eating foods that are fat free, low fat, lite, low sodium, low cholesterol … am I forgetting anything? While fat, sodium, and cholesterol are all worth keeping an eye on, don’t let them overshadow the one thing that really matters, and that’s the calories you consume. The bottom line will always be:

Calories In — Calories Out = Weight Loss, Gain, or Maintenance

To lose weight, you need to eat fewer calories than you expend. Exercise will increase your calories out, but the real trick is to limit what you take in. Which brings us to the crucial question: Do you really know how many calories you’re eating? Take my quiz and see.

1. To lose one pound this week, which of these snacks should you cut from your daily diet?

a) slice of cake

b) candy bar and soda

c) plate of chips and creamy dip

Answer: a, b, or c. Each snack shown is about 500 calories. In order to lose one pound per week, you need to create a weekly caloric deficit of 3,500 calories, or 500 fewer calories per day (500 x 7 days=one pound of weight loss per week). This means that by cutting any one of these snacks–or 500 other unnecessary calories-each day, you’ll be able to meet your weight-loss goal.

2. Which of these options provides a satisfying 200-calorie filling for your sandwich?

a) two tablespoons of peanut butter

b) five ounces of turkey

c) veggies and two slices of low-fat cheese

Answer: b or c. All three of these options come in at around 200 calories, but that doesn’t necessarily mean each one will leave you feeling equally full. Do me a favor: Get out the peanut butter and measure two tablespoons (190 calories). Shocking, isn’t it? Can you limit your sandwich spread to that portion? Probably not–in fact, most peanut butter sandwiches are made with double that amount. Note to all moms out there: Choices b and c are the healthy way to go. Pack your kids (and yourself) a vegetable-and-cheese or turkey sandwich for lunch, and you’ll fill up faster-on fewer calories.

3. For the lightest breakfast, what’s your first choice?

a) deli-size bagel, jam topping

b) deli-size cinnamon-raisin bagel, no topping

c) small frozen bagel, cream-cheese topping

Answer: c. Did you know that many deli bagels are almost 500 calories before any topping is added? A small frozen bagel is half the size and less than half the calories (about 180), meaning you could add cream cheese (100 calories for two tablespoons) and still have a lighter breakfast than if you ate a plain deli bagel. And for the record, bagels with add-ins like raisins and chocolate chips can have even higher calorie counts.

4. Pick the omelet with fewer calories:

a) one-whole-egg omelet

b) four-egg-white omelet

Answer: b. An average egg contains 75 calories; 60 of those come from the yolk. For just 15 calories each, egg whites can be used in place of whole eggs in omelets. One word of caution: If you order an egg-white omelet in a restaurant, ask the kitchen to use a nonstick spray rather than butter, or you’ll double the calories in your meal.

5. If you’re trying to lose weight, which beverage is the worst breakfast choice?

beverage

a) water

b) soda

c) juice

d) coffee

Answer: c. Water, coffee, and even soda are, from a caloric point of view, better options than juice, which is about 15 calories an ounce. Water is your best choice-it’s the beverage your body needs most, and the one that many people don’t get enough of. If you must have juice, use lots of ice or dilute it with water. And if you are really serious about losing weight, measure the juice first, so you’ll know how many calories you’re drinking.

6. You’re at a restaurant and the waiter brings bread. You know it’s better to …

a) spread it with butter

b) dip it in olive oil

Answer: a. Despite all you’ve heard about olive oil being the kind of fat that’s heart-friendly (which is true), when it comes to cutting calories, butter wins the battle. (One tablespoon is 100 calories versus 120 calories per tablespoon of oil.) The bottom line: Both pack a lot of calories into a small serving size, so serious dieters should purchase an oil sprayer that provides maximum food coverage with a minimal amount of fat.

7. Which one the slimmest pick for dinner?

a) cheeseburger

b) Caesar salad

c) one slice of cheese pizza

Answer: c. A small slice of cheese pizza has about 250 calories, 50 fewer than the 300-calorie cheeseburger and 400 fewer than the 650-calorie Caesar salad. Surprised about the salad? The good news: You can buy low-calorie bottled dressing in most grocery stores or, better yet, make it yoursef.

8. Choose the lunch that’s lighter in calories:

a) tuna-salad sandwich and diet Coke

b) roast beef sandwich, apple, Oreo cookie

Answer: b. We’ve all been told that fish is less caloric than red meat, and that’s true. But at 100 calories per tablespoon, mayonnaise turns this tuna salad into a diet disaster (750 calories versus 480 for option b). Still, a six-ounce can of tuna in water has only 200 calories, making it a great choice if you mix it with a little low-calorie mayonnaise, lemon, or Dijon mustard or simply place it on top of a dinner salad.

9. Which of these salad-bar dressings has fewer calories?

a) balsamic vinegar

b) vinaigrette

Answer: a. At salad bars, it’s usually the dressing that gets you into trouble. For instance, two cups of cooked pasta have 400 calories. But add vinaigrette-with its three tablespoons of oil-and you’re getting another 360 calories. Vinegar, on the other hand, is virtually calorie free.

10. Rank these breakfasts from most to least calories:

a) bowl of granola, half cup of low-fat milk

b) bowl of cornflakes, half cup of low-fat milk, banana, half of a grapefruit

c) two pieces of toast with Jam, fruit salad, fried egg

Answer: a, c, b. One ounce of granola has about 125 calories, which doesn’t sound like a lot until you consider that the average bowl easily holds four ounces. With the addition of milk-even the low-fat kind–your breakfast could easily top 500 calories. Breakfast c, on the other hand, weighs in at around 360 calories, while b, the slimmest pick of all, is a mere 300 calories.

Dieting 101

1) How many calories are in a pound?
a. 4,000 c. 5,000 b. 5,500 d. 3,500

2) How many calories are in one egg white?
a. 15 c. 40 b. 35 d. 50

3) A plain (no topping) bagel from the deli contains how many calories?
a. 150 c. 500 b. 200 d. 700

4) You love to have fruit juice in the morning. How many calories are in an eight-ounce glass?
a. 40 c. 90 b. 55 d. 120

5) The most popular salad in the United States is Caesar salad. How many calories are in a typical dinner-size serving?
a. 750 c. 350 b. 450 d. 650

6) You’re standing at the salad bar, trying to make a smart choice. About how many calories are in a two-cup serving of pasta salad with vinaigrette?
a. 560 c. 760 b. 660 d. 860

7) Approximately how many calories are in one tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil?
a. 160 c. 140 b. 120 d. 80

8) Approximately how many calories are in an average deli-counter tuna-salad sandwich?
a. 750 c. 450 b. 350 d. 650

9) How many calories are in one tablespoon of peanut butter?
a. 75 c. 65 b. 95 d. 105

10) One ounce of granola cereal has approximately how many calories?
a. 125 c. 145 b. 135 d. 155

Answers: 1. d; 2. a; 3. c; 4. d; 5. d; 6. c; 7. b; 8. a; 9. b; 10. a

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The truth about diet supplements

Big promises in little pills sound too good to be true. For good reason.

diet-supplements

Before one of the first high school football games of the 2002 season, 16-year-old Sean Riggins of Lincoln City, Ill., took Yellow Jackets, a diet supplement and energy booster, to improve his performance that night. A trip to the gas station to pick up the pills was a common practice among teammates.

Despite his hopes of playing a great game, Sean ended up sitting on the bench because of a headache and an upset stomach. He didn’t feel better the next day. Sean visited his doctor but later began to convulse and eventually stopped breathing. Within hours, he was dead.

The cause of Sean’s death? A heart attack due to a chemical called ephedra in the pills. In a statement to the U.S. Senate following Sean’s death, the county coroner said that Yellow Jackets were commonly used by teens seeking quick weight loss and extra energy. Sean’s death was one of more than 150 linked to use of ephedra (also called ma huang). In 2004 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned the substance. (At press time, courts were trying to determine whether low-dose versions of ephedra will be allowable.)

No Quick Fix

diet-pill

The Yellow Jackets that Sean took aren’t the only readily available supplements that claim to boost energy, build bulk, or shed pounds. Ali, 18, of Pompano Beach, Fla., has been taking diet pills for years. “I’ve taken TrimSpa, Xenadrine, green tea, ephedra, cider pills,” she says. “You name it, I’ve taken it.”

Promises of a quick fix are appealing to people who think they need to lose weight, bulk up, or improve their stamina. Images prevalent in the media promote the notion that the “perfect body” is one that is lean and sculpted. So it’s no surprise that shelves are packed with products that promise rapid weight loss or a buff physique overnight.

“The quick-fix claims make supplements especially attractive to adolescents who aren’t thinking long term,” says Alison Field, an epidemiologist and assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. (Want proof that teens are targeted? Think about where the ads for such products appear: TV channels, Web sites, and magazines that appeal to young people, for example.)

There’s no guarantee, though, that these pills will actually deliver any long-term weight loss or muscle boost–quick or not. In fact, most diet supplements on the market have not been proved to be effective. For example, when it comes to losing weight, time and discipline are still the best bets. “A prudent, reduced-calorie diet and increased energy expenditure exercise are the only safe and effective means of weight loss for teens,” says Christine Hailer, assistant professor of medicine at the University of California at San Francisco.

Even if the products appear to work at first, “as soon as they are stopped, then weight regain will occur, unless significant changes in eating and behavior patterns have been made,” says Hailer.

It’s a Gamble

With ephedra pulled from the market, many people may assume that supplements without this ingredient are OK. But Hailer and a team of scientists studied ephedra-free supplements and found that they’re anything but safe, despite the way they’re marketed. Many supplements are touted as “all natural.” Consumers may see this claim and believe the products to be healthy and safe. But plenty of natural ingredients can be hazardous to human health (poisonous mushrooms, for example, or honey, which can kill babies).

One natural product, the dried peel of the bitter orange, is marketed as a supplement that speeds up metabolism. Since the ban on ephedra took effect, bitter orange has been added to many weight-loss supplements. On its Web site, the Mayo Clinic disputes the “natural is safe” claim: “Bitter orange contains synephrine and octopamine–chemicals that are similar to ephedrine in ephedra.” Synephrine and octopamine mimic the harmful effects of ephedra, such as cardiovascular problems and death.

How do supplement makers get away with selling potentially dangerous products? Although the FDA oversees most drugs on the market, diet supplements are not regulated. Supplement manufacturers are not required to show testing for safety, interactions with medications, or long-term side effects. It’s a scary thought, but there’s no way to be sure that the products contain the sub stances listed on the labels. Only the manufacturer–who makes money from sales of the product–determines whether such supplements are safe, effective, and marketed truthfully.

Even using supplements that have undergone testing doesn’t put teens in the clear. Almost all products are tested on adults. That means the dosages may not be accurate for younger users, and there may be unknown health risks. Most supplement labels have statements indicating that the products are not for purchase by anyone younger than 18. Because vendors rarely verify a buyer’s age, teens may assume the products are safe.

“Young people should know they are essentially part of a large uncontrolled experiment when they take these products,” says Haller.

Trouble in a Pill

weightloss-for-teens

Field has studied the diet and weight-change practices of teens, some of whom used body-enhancing supplements. The study found that boys are just as likely as girls to use supplements to change their appearance, either to tone or bulk up. About 12 percent of boys (compared with 8 percent of girls) reported using supplements in the previous year. “We all knew that females are really focused on the media and are willing to do extremely unhealthy things to achieve that ideal. We were surprised to find that boys are also willing to do that,” Field says.

Andrew, a 17-year-old from Riverside, Calif., is a perfect example. After upping his workout routine and improving his diet over several weeks, he wasn’t seeing the results he wanted. He began using a diet pill and, over a period of two months, was able to lose weight and increase muscle more quickly.

“After a few weeks, I began to notice results, and I lost 15 pounds. I lost a lot of body fat and gained muscle,” he says. “People say these pills mess up your liver, your heart, your kidneys, and soon become addicting, but I have never experienced these problems.”

Any damage that supplements did to his body, however, may not be apparent for years. And Andrew’s results may be more lasting because of his dedicated effort to improve other areas of his lifestyle. But he took a risk in not talking to his doctor first. (Andrew says he didn’t discuss the pills with his doctor because he is not yet 18, the legal age for supplement purchase.)

Ali says the effects of the supplements vary, depending on the length of time she uses them. “I’m normally hyped up for a while. But eventually I start to get used to [the product] and just feel strained and stressed,” she says.

That can lead to dangerous cycling through different weight-loss drugs and may even provide the perfect launching ground for an eating disorder, as it did for Ali. She tells Current Health that the advantages of the pills are few compared with the damage her addiction is doing. “There are no benefits, really, that outweigh when my organs shut down,” she points out.

Think About It

If you feel that you need to lose weight, your first step should be to consult your doctor for advice. Quick-fix pills aren’t just too good to be true. They can be harmful–or even lethal.

“Most of the kids today don’t realize the danger of these so-called supplements,” Kevin Riggins, Sean’s father, said in testimony before a Senate subcommittee. “Kids tend to think they are invincible; ‘that can’t happen to me, those things happen to other people.’ These kids have no idea that these products have a very deadly effect.”

BEFORE YOU POP A PILL, CONSIDER ITS ILLS

  • Ask your doctor’s advice. That should be the first step in any weight-loss plan.
  • If you do research online, know your sources. Check that the Web site is maintained by the government, a university, or a reputable medical association.
  • Do the product claims sound too good to be true? If so, then they probably are.
  • Be wary of money-back guarantees. Companies that sell fake or fraudulent products have several ways of slipping through guarantee loopholes.
  • Don’t fall for the “all-natural” lure. When consumed in high amounts over a long period of time, all chemicals can be toxic.
  • Go to the source. Contact the manufacturer for more information on the product. Put the company on the spot by inquiring about research to back up its claims. Ask what tests have been done and what systems are in place to ensure product quality.

Discuss

  1. In the diet study reported on in the article, how many teens said they had used diet supplements in the previous year? (about 12 percent of boys and 8 percent of girls)
  2. How are diet supplements regulated differently from drugs? (The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has no oversight of supplements; manufacturers do not have to test for safety or effectiveness; the products may not contain the ingredients that labels say they do.)
  3. How would you decide whether a dietary supplement is safe to use? (Answers will vary.)

Do

Engage your students in some role playing. For example: Brad’s teammates try to persuade him to take energy supplements before the big divisional play-off; Donna wants to lose weight, and her friend offers to share a bottle of diet pills; Sam is tempted by the stories about quick bulk-building products in muscle magazines at the gym. Select students to act out the scenarios, and then ask the class to suggest how these characters can make the healthiest choices to reach their goals.

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Want a flat belly … with (almost) no effort?

All you need is a few minutes a day and these four simple moves

Have you ever done bunches of crunches yet still had a pot belly? Here’s a dirty little secret: Ab exercises can make you bulge more. “Crunches can shorten and compress your waistline,” says fitness coach Elaine Petrone, who shares her ab-flattening moves here. “Abdominals crunch your ribs toward your pelvis. Your abs have no choice but to be pushed up and out.” Her remedy: moves that increase flexibility in legs, back, and buttocks to realign your ribs and pelvis. Don’t be fooled–these moves work the abs, too, by lengthening them.

Bonus: You can do them anywhere!

1. Sneaky side-slimmer

a) Sit on a chair with your hands on your thighs. Locate your “sits” bones; when you’re sitting on a firm chair, you can feel them pointing down right where your thighs and your butt meet.

Sneaky side-slimmer

b) Using the muscles that surround the sits bones, lift your left sits bone. You can slide your hands up, but don’t tilt your upper body or push with your foot. Contract the muscle and lift it as high as you can, using the lower abs (just below your navel). Do ten reps on each side.

2. Stomach-sculptor

Stomach-sculptora) Kneel, sitting back on your heels. Rest both hands on your thighs.

b) Slowly start to lift your butt off your heels as if you were going to stand up, scooping in your lower abs and tightening your buttocks. You don’t need to rise up very high–just a few inches off your heels. Hold for a count of three and slowly return to the starting position. Start with ten reps; work your way up to 50.

3. Lower-ab lunge

a) Sit on the floor on a towel or yoga mat with your legs out in front of you.

Lower-ab lungeb) As if you were going to lie down, roll yourself back, starting with your tailbone and proceeding one vertebra at a time. Relax your hip joints; this allows you to flatten your lower abs into your pelvis as you roll down. Your heels should stay in place. As soon as you feel your heels slip, slowly return to start. (If your heels move, it means you’re no longer using your abs to control the motion.) Each time you come up, sit up higher than before. Do ten reps; work up to 15.

b

4. Belly-lengthener

a) Lifting the rib cage actually flattens the stomach. Stand with feet about shoulder-length apart. Bend arms at elbows and place both hands at the back of your head, cradling it.

Belly-lengthenerb) Slowly look up at the ceiling, allowing your head to fall gently back into your arms, and arch your upper chest (you should feel this sneaky ab move in your upper chest). Return to start. Do three reps.

You can go back to home for more information.

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Thirsty or Not, Your Body Needs Fluid Replacement

There’s nothing like an icy-cold soda pop, straight from the refrigerator or vending machine on a hot, sweltering day after a run or a game of tennis. Nectar of the gods, right? Gets those fluids right back in there and gets you going again….

icy-cold-sodaWell, if you are savoring that drink, thinking that you are also doing your body a favor by replacing needed fluids, you are bing misled by a common myth about fluid replacement.

It is true that drinking fluids can refresh you after an overheated workout, provide you with energy to go on, and replace the fluids your body needs. But the wrong fluids, like soda pop after a workout (which can cause headaches or nausea), can upset your stomach, impair your judgment, and actually make you lose fluid, according to a recent Runner’s World magazine report.

Exercise destabilizes your body fluids. It elevates body temperature and depletes the body of fluids. Your body desperately needs fluid replacement.

What to Drink?

Hands down–it’s water, say the experts. One trip to any supermarket drink shelf could make a person drop from thirst until they decide what to drink. Water doesn’t come simply from the tap anymore: There is seltzer water, sparking water, spring water, and flavored water. Juices used to be limited to apple, orange, and tomato. Today, not only is there grapefruit, cranberry, and apricot, but also blends of three or more fruits. You can’t ignore the fluid-replacement drinks, carbohydrate-loading drinks, and nutrient-supplement drinks marketed to athletes. And there are always the old standbys: soda pop, coffee, and tea (herbal, caffeine-free, or sodium-free).

Experts agree that water, and not sugary drinks, should be a mainstay in your drink diet — after sports or not. After all, your body is 60 percent water, and your sweat is between 90 percent and 99 percent water. You can find out how much water you are losing from a workout by weighing yourself before and after exercised. Every pound lost is a pint of water say experts.

water

Water in your system is necessary for energy metabolism, controlling body temperature, and getting rid of wastes. Water contains minerals–hard water contains more than soft water. Your body needs the water more than the minerals, and passes through your system faster than other drinks.

Drink tap water, experts say, but if you prefer bottled water, you might be interested in the differences among store-bought waters:

  1. Spring water is water from an underground reservoir with nothing added.
  2. Some sparking water is water that has had carbon dioxide added to give it fizz. Naturally sparkling water has a natural fizz.
  3. Seltzer water is tap water with carbonation, but no added minerals or salts.
  4. Mineral water must have a mineral content of at least 500 parts per million and contain calcium, magnesium, sodium, and other minerals.
  5. Club soda is tap water that has been artifically carbonated with added minerals and salts.

So, after that tennis match or softball game, don’t reach for the soda pop. Instead, fill your glass with water — a cool, refreshing, natural fluid replacement.

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5 Reasons Why You Did Not Achieve Good Results

Exercises are believed to be good for everybody. But what can individuals do if they did not receive good results after the practicing process. Or they are still not achieving the results which they expected. Each individual must find a suitable exercising program for themselves. There are also lots of factors affected when people are trying to lose their weight or tone up.

exerciseTherefore, if you haven’t get the expected results, one of these following reasons below may be the main problem. Let’s find out and change this from today.

 1. YOU ARE NOT PUT MUCH EFFORT

If you have spent lots of time to do exercises, then you will get good results and achieve all the goals. When the body is getting used to workout with high-intensity practices, it will become more effective in getting the results after a long period of time.

So, this is the time for realizing that you haven’t put enough effort. In fact, the body has just burned a few calories. In addition, you won’t receive any chances when you are still repeating this speed of exercising over and over again.

How to solve: So as to achieve good results, try to challenge yourself for more difficult activities. Instead of doing exercises outside the house, why don’t consider buying one exercising machine to workout at home. For example, the Schwinn Ic2 is perfect for home users because it gives you the sense of riding an outdoor bike. Or you can find out the best indoor bikes for you after checking out these spin bike reviews here.

Try to make changes in some aspects such as duration, frequency or intensity. For instance, testing one type of exercise into the workout routine like cardio activities, adding one loop when running around the neighborhood.

 2. YOU ARE PRACTICING TOO MUCH

practice-too-muchWhen you are working too hard regularly, you are more likely to damage your muscular parts rather than building them. Therefore, spend time resting between these hard-working day. For most people, working too hard can results in some health problems include:

  • Headaches, insomnia
  • Do not have much motivation
  • Hurt all the muscular parts.

How to solve: take some days off and hang out with friends or family to release all the stress. Although you may don’t want to do this, think of the body additionally. Moreover, try to sleep enough and have meals with nutritious ingredients.

 3. YOU STILL NOT EAT PROPERLY

not-eat-properlyPractice exercises regularly is awesome. But if you still not eat in a correct way, this won’t help getting good results. Consider pick up the right type of food for each meal, eating too much will cause you to gain weight immediately. In contrast, eating too little will make people feel more exhausted after doing workouts.

How to solve: figure out the amount of food consumed every day and reduce this day by day. For people who want to build muscle, eat lots of chicken meats. They are very useful. In addition, eat more green food such as vegetables, fruits, even drink fruit juices.

 4. YOU SIT ALL DAY LONG

It is good that you work out regularly. However, you spend the rest of your day sitting in front the television or computer. This will pay back all the workouts which you aimed to get through. Studies have shown that sitting too much will affect serious to both your waistlines and health.

How to solve: try to do different activities such as play with your dogs, walk up or down the stairs. On the other hand, if your job requires you to sit all day, spend some time standing up and go for a walk around your office.

5. LACK OF SLEEP

sleepNowadays, people are so busy with their job. They rarely have enough time for sleeping and relaxing. In fact, sleep is one of the main aspects that affect your weight-loss process. Sleeps stimulate a number of hormones that affect your weight and hunger.

How to solve: make plan for both practicing exercises and sleeping. Remember not to break any rules. Doing exercises when not having enough sleep will damage badly to your health. Consider sleeping first – before doing exercises.

If you haven’t get the good results, you may step in one of these reasons above. Try to follow these tips better and you will achieve what you deserve.

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Should You Have a Stress Test Before You Exercise?

exercise-everyday

Exercise is good for your health, producing important benefits for your heart, circulation, muscles, joints, metabolism, and even your mind. But it also has risks; injuries to tendons and muscles are the most common, cardiac problems the most serious. To avert the latter, the American Heart Association and the American College of Sports Medicine recommend exercise stress testing for men over 40 before they embark on a vigorous exercise program.

It’s a conservative, legally sound recommendation that’s based on an appealing theory: exercise makes the heart work harder, so it needs more oxygen. If there are blockages in the coronary arteries, the heart muscle won’t get all the oxygen-rich blood it needs. This lack of oxygen, called ischemia, may produce the chest pain of angina, but even if it doesn’t, it may show up on the electrocardiogram (EKG). Best of all, since the stress test is performed under close medical supervision, it should be able to detect heart disease in the safety of an exercise lab before it strikes during unsupervised exercise.

It’s an appealing theory, but it has flaws. The expense and inconvenience of routine testing would be considerable, but few would quibble about time and money if it could save lives. But will it? And might routine stress testing actually do more harm than good, at least for some men? A study from 1991 provides some answers to the question for middle-aged men, and new guidelines from the Yale University School of Medicine are now available to help address the issue for older men.

The earlier report evaluated 3,617 men between the ages of 35 and 69. None of them had been diagnosed with coronary artery disease when the study began, but all were at increased risk because of high cholesterol levels. All the volunteers had stress tests before they began to exercise on their own, and the tests were repeated every year during an observation period that lasted an average of nearly 71/2 years. Even in these high-risk men who had annual testing, however, stress tests were not good at predicting exercise-induced cardiac problems; less than a quarter of the men who experienced difficulties had abnormal stress tests. The good news, though, is that exercise was safe; even in these high-risk middle-aged men, fewer than 2% experienced cardiac events during more than seven years of exercise.

But even if exercise tests are not sensitive ways to screen for silent heart disease, why not use them to detect the small number of men who turn out to have exercise-induced heart problems? It’s a good question, but doctors have a sobering answer: In men with a low to average risk of heart disease who have no symptoms, abnormal stress tests are wrong far more often than they are right. For example, in healthy 50-year-old men who feel well, four out of every five abnormal tests are false positives, diagnosing coronary artery disease when none is present.

A test that misses heart disease gives false reassurance to men at risk of heart attacks. And a test that diagnoses heart disease in men who are actually healthy produces needless worry and lifestyle restrictions – to say nothing of higher insurance premiums and unnecessary follow-up tests and treatments. All in all, routine exercise testing probably produces more harm than good in middle-aged men who are free of the signs and symptoms of heart disease.

But what of older men? Men in their 60s, 70s, and 80s benefit from exercise every bit as much as younger men (see Harvard Men’s Health Watch, April 2000), but do they need stress tests first? The doctors from Yale estimated the risk of having a heart attack during exercise in men of different ages:

For the purposes of this study, moderate intensity is the equivalent of walking 3-4 miles an hour, and high intensity is jogging at 5 miles an hour or faster, biking at 10-12 miles an hour, playing singles tennis, or skiing downhill.

In interpreting these figures, the Yale scientists argue that stress testing is no more useful for older men without diagnosed cardiovascular disease than for middle-aged men. That’s because the risk of an exercise-induced heart attack is so low, and because older men are not likely to push themselves to the maximum because of the physical limitations that often accompany aging. They might have added that wisdom and common sense also accrue in maturity.

Although the new study disputes the value of routine stress testing before exercise for older men, it does not question the value of a thorough medical evaluation. Here are the safe exercise guidelines proposed by Yale:

* All men should have a complete history and physical examination and a resting EKG before they begin an exercise program. Cardiovascular reserve can be evaluated by simple maneuvers; for example, men who can walk a flight of stairs briskly or cycle in the air for a minute while sitting or lying on the exam table should be fit enough to start exercise.

* Men with evidence of a previous heart attack (especially within six months), uncontrolled high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, or an abnormal heart rhythm should be referred for a stress test and a detailed evaluation; depending on the results, they should be either restricted from exercising until their condition improves, referred to a medically monitored exercise program, or instructed in special precautions for unsupervised exercise.

* All previously sedentary older people should start with low-intensity exercise and build up gradually. They should warm up before each exercise session and cool down afterward. They should also design a comprehensive program, with exercises for strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination as well as aerobic exercise such as walking (see HMHW, August 2000 and March 2001).

low-intensity exercise

With or without an exercise test, the caution for older men is to start low and go slow. In a modified form, it’s good advice for younger men too. And whether you’re an experienced athlete or a novice, no test is a substitute for the most important guideline of all: Listen to your body. Learn about the warning signs of heart disease, including chest pain or pressure, undue shortness of breath, fatigue or sweating, an erratic pulse, lightheadedness, or even indigestion. And while you’re protecting your heart, don’t neglect the rest of your body. Pay attention to aches and pains that may signal an injury. Don’t exercise if you are feverish or ill. Work yourself back into shape gradually after a layoff, particularly after illness or injury. Stay well hydrated, dress appropriately, use good equipment and proper technique, and observe the rules of the road to avoid accidents.

Men with suspected or known cardiovascular disease certainly need exercise tests and individual exercise prescriptions before they embark on serious exercise. Men who appear healthy but have major cardiac risk factors may also benefit from testing. The latest techniques that use nuclear imaging or echocardiography can improve the accuracy of standard EKG testing (see HMHW, March 1997). But new research suggests that healthy men, young and old, can do as well with a general checkup, prudent guidelines, and self-monitoring. In this era of high-tech medicine, it’s nice that at least one thing is getting simpler.

Risk per Million Hours of Exercise

Age                          Moderate Intensity             High Intensity

75-79                       8.6                                          40.7

80-84                      8.6                                          43.5

85 and older          11.2                                         57.1

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Balancing act: find the body weight that’s best for you through a blend of ingenuity and exercise

burn-caloriesIn theory, the energy equation that determines your total body weight should be exceedingly simple: The number of calories you take in should equal the number of calories you burn. Like new math, however, it never ends up being that easy. And as a result, many people, runners included, struggle to achieve a precarious balance.

Small wonder. The average person takes in more than 9 million calories in a decade–the equivalent of more than 2,500 pounds of fat. Difficult to swallow, isn’t it? But the sinful stuff is even more difficult to pass up. The compromise is to exercise. Recent research suggests that burning calories is far more effective than skimping on them to maintain your weight. Calorie cutting cheats your body of necessary nutrients and slows your metabolism to conserve energy.

But I’m telling you things you probably already know. Perhaps you run 4 miles a day, every day–but you can’t get rid of your spare tire. Why can’t you lose weight even with exercise? Calorie-burning potential is partially predetermined, a product of genetics and gender. But not all of it. Fiddling with what and when you eat and when and how you exercise can be very effective.

FACTS AND FIGURES

The calories you ingest by eating foods and drinking beverages are referred to as “calories in.” Those you burn by doing anything from brushing your teeth to running a marathon are called “calories out.” To maintain your body weight, calories in must equal calories out. To lose weight, you must reduce calories in and maintain calories out. Or maintain calories in and increase calories out. Or reduce calories in and increase calories out. As you can see, this is where things get a little sticky.

calories-in-out

Three factors contribute to calorie burning. The most important is your resting metabolic rate, which is the amount of energy your body uses for basic functions such as breathing, thinking and pumping blood and oxygen through your body. For most people, this accounts for 60 to 75 percent of total calorie burning each day, or about 1,100 to 2,000 calories.

The speed of your resting metabolic rate depends primarily on your body composition. The more muscle or “lean body mass” you have, the faster your metabolic rate. Women, by their very nature, have proportionately more body fat and less muscle than men, so they end up with metabolic rates roughly 10 percent lower than men. Metabolic rates for both men and women drop as they grow older, due in part to loss of muscle mass.

As the second factor in the “calories out” part of the equation, activity accounts for 15 to 35 percent of total calorie burning. Any activity you engage in–walking, running or just plain fidgeting–burns calories above your resting metabolic rate. Of course, running burns more calories than fidgeting, so this factor varies according to the type of activities you do and how long you do them.

The third and least significant of the calorie-burning components is the energy your body expends processing food. Digesting, transporting and storing protein, carbohydrate and fat is hard work–and accounts for 75 to 200 calories burned per day. While this thermic effect of food (TEF), as it is called, usually represents no more than 10 percent of your total calorie needs per day, small fluctuations in TEF can add up over time. Some obese people, for instance, have low TEF values, which may contribute to their propensity to gain weight.

SUREFIRE SOLUTIONS

As you can see, your body burns calories naturally-up to a point. Following are a few ways you can increase the burn and balance a caloric equation that has even your own body stumped:

* Train regularly. Running or exercising regularly helps you regulate your food intake. When you don’t exercise, your body loses touch with its own internal regulatory system. Hunger signals and feelings of fullness aren’t as sharp. As a result, your eating patterns and body weight tend to fluctuate more.

running* Maximize the afterburn. Running not only boosts calorie burning during exercise, it increases it afterward, too. For up to 24 hours after a workout, your resting metabolic rate is faster than normal, burning anywhere from 50 to a few hundred more calories than usual. While this may not sound like much, it adds up. In the end, exercise afterburn could save you the equivalent of 2 to 5 pounds of fat over several months.

You can make the most of this afterburn by increasing the amount of time you exercise as well as how vigorously or intensely you work out several times a week. Because afterburn is simply the body working hard (and expending calories) to rebuild spent glycogen stores, repair damaged muscle fibers and normalize body temperature after an exhausting workout, the harder you work out, the greater the afterburn.

* Dash and dine. Eating soon after exercise may boost calorie burning. Various studies have shown that TEF is greater after exercise. As you know, your body burns extra calories after you work out, and since your resting metabolic rate revs up immediately after you eat, the addition of a meal may boost calorie burning that much more.

TEF may not rise with exercise in all individuals, however, especially those at opposite ends of the spectrum. Although the reason is unclear, unfit individuals and highly trained athletes don’t seem to burn extra calories after a meal.

* Pump up. Aside from the fact that it may very well improve your running, strength training will help you increase your lean body mass and rev up your resting metabolic rate. How? By building muscle. Since muscle tissue requires more caloric energy than fat tissue, your body will expend extra calories if it becomes more muscular.

* Eat up. Calorie skimpers know all too well the frustration of a slowed metabolism. As a regular runner you can afford to eat more than others. After all, your body will burn more calories if you boost your food intake. And if you take in more calories to offset the calories burned during exercise, your body will expend that much more energy on “shipping and handling” all of the incoming calories.

* Eat often. In a recent study of lean women, 75 percent reported eating at least four times a day. People who struggle with unwanted pounds often skip meals in an effort to control their weight. Whether this leads to obesity by prompting overeating at other meals, or whether missing out on meals is an eating habit that develops in an effort to lose weight is still unclear. The bottom line, however, is not: Eat often.

* Skim the fat. A diet composed of lots of carbohydrate (more than 60 percent) and little fat (less than 25 percent) increases calorie burning. Why? Because your body processes and stores fat very efficiently. In fact, when given a choice, the body prefers to store fat rather than burn it immediately for energy. Carbohydrates, on the other hand, are either burned quickly or stored as glycogen or fat. Because the body doesn’t store carbohydrates very efficiently, your TEF rises, burning calories.

TEF is lower after a high-fat meal than after a high-carbohydrate meal because it costs the body very little to move fat from the intestines into fat storage. Not so with carbohydrates. As a result, you burn fewer calories while you sleep after eating a high-fat meal than after eating a meal packed with carbohydrates. Again, these few calories here and there add up over time and can lead to unwanted pounds.

If you simply cannot rein in your fat intake to under 25 percent, try to eat a little less overall. Studies have shown that energy balance can be maintained on fewer calories when you eat a high-fat diet. Of course, maintaining your health on a high-fat diet is a much different matter.

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